Bloomberg Wants Bruins!

Bloomberg street view

Last week the UCLA Career Center was invited to visit Bloomberg’s headquarters in New York City, NY for their annual University Day.  UCLA is one of only 24 schools nationwide that Bloomberg invited to this exclusive event to attract more top technical talent.

What do you think of when you hear “Bloomberg“?  For most people, Michael Bloomberg (founder and former NYC mayor), financial information, and media are the first things that may spring to mind.  However, in terms of college recruiting, Bloomberg wants you to think of them as a tech company like Google, Facebook, or Apple.  Their primary hiring need is for Software Developers.

Bloomberg university list

Table assignments by university. You’ll see UCLA spent the day at a table with our “rivals” USC and Cal.

Work Environment

It just wouldn’t be a tech company without a lot of free food for employees.  They serve breakfast every morning, soup at 11am (for which the employees rush to the 6th floor en masse – it’s quite a sight to see), candy every afternoon, dinner at 8pm for those who are working late, and ice cream on Fridays.  And it’s not just a lot of food, it’s GOOD food.

There are no solid interior walls except for the user experience lab, where a team of researchers, designers, and engineers observe clients utilizing their products in order to gain insights and make improvements.  Not even the CEO and executives have office walls, nor does the “green room” where guests wait for their “on air” time in the TV and radio studios on the 5th floor.

We weren’t allowed to take photos of much of the interior of the building, but Business Insider did in 2012 when they spotlighted Bloomberg LP as one of the 15 coolest offices in tech.

Bloomberg horseshoe

The building is shaped like a horseshoe.  This symbol of good luck and fortune pervades Bloomberg’s culture.

Why NYC (aka Silicon Alley)?

New York is a rapidly expanding tech hub with over 3,000 tech companies located there.  Well established companies such as Google, Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Etsy and Yelp have NY locations, as do thousands of emerging startups.

Check out Made in NY for more info about the tech industry in NY and visit this Jobs Map to see where there are job openings at NY tech companies.

Bloomberg 29 view

View from the 29th floor of Bloomberg’s NYC office. That’s Central Park on the left. Not sure about you, but I could get used to this…

Opportunities for College Students and Graduates

Software Engineer Interns at Bloomberg get to work on real projects that will actually be used.  Their training is dynamic and hands-on and they have an opportunity to work alongside a cohort of fellow interns, as well as an assigned mentor.

In addition to the quality of the professional experience they gain, interns also get to enjoy a number of fun social perks including picnics, tech talks, game nights, contests, community service, and free museum admission throughout NYC for the summer.

Bloomberg group photo

UCLA Career Center staff, Dr. Bill Goodin, Bloomberg recruiters, and Bloomberg’s current UCLA interns at University Day 2015.

Full-time entry-level hires with a CS background go through a 12-week training bootcamp in which they work with various teams in order to determine their best fit.  Full-time entry-level hires with some relevant technical training/knowledge, but without a CS degree, go through a more intensive 16-week training class and come out the other end as software engineers!

When can you meet Bloomberg at UCLA? UPDATED 10/12/15

Don’t miss your opportunity to meet them in person to express your interest and learn more!  View our full list of Fairs & Events as well as our tips to help you Prepare for Career Fairs.

Mon 10/12: CS Internship Career Fair. 1pm-4pm.

Mon 10/12: UPE Honors Mixer. 5pm-6pm.

Tue 10/13: Computer Science Showcase. 6:30pm-8:30pm.

Wed 10/14: 2015 Engineering & Technical Fair Day 1. 11am-3pm.

Wed 10/28: Tech Talk. 6:30pm.

Wed 10/28: On-campus Interviews

Thu 10/29: On-campus Interviews Day 2

What do Bloomberg’s current UCLA interns have to say?

We were fortunate enough to meet five current summer interns over cupcakes to learn more about their experience at Bloomberg so far (they were in Week 3 of the internship).  They were clearly having a great time and had built up camaraderie with each other – laughing, smiling, and sharing stories.  Watch the following videos to hear two of the interns share some tips and insight with their fellow Bruins about the Bloomberg experience.

Why should UCLA students consider interning at Bloomberg?

How to prepare for an internship at Bloomberg?

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THE GREATEST PIECE OF ADVICE I HAVE LEARNED – Part 2

95475-12042514041853 Last year, with choosing a major being one of my primary headaches, I, unexpectedly, decided to take a computer science course. I heard coding consumes life. I knew projects are often finished through a week of trial and error. My friend’s joke that she woke up at 3 am suddenly with a solution to one homework problems finally occurring to her head indeed intimidated me. Still, with no programming background, I was determined to take up such a challenge.

Although I was overwhelmed by the endless concepts in this new world most of the time, I was totally amazed by how everything works magically. I could still remember the time when I started to get myself familiar with the software development environment on a computer and spent almost an hour in attempting to create my very first project by carefully following the instructions word by word (even though I knew nothing about their meanings) I jotted down even the simplest codes that my professor mentioned in lectures and could not wait to run them on a physical computer after class.

However, as time went by, I became increasingly frustrated. My frustrations not only came from staring at my computer for hours without coming up with even a single line of code or frequently debugging my programs till very late at night. I felt I fell behind most of my peer who were already programming experts or gifted prodigies. Some started at a pretty young age and were already fluent in various programming languages. Others were proud of their experience in working on complicated projects with large teams prestigious companies or even have several original mobile apps to their names. People always say that talent play a large role in this industry. Am I a real late starter? I constantly asked myself whenever I had a hard time understanding a chunk of code while others seem to finish doing it so effortlessly. I attended those engineering career fairs, timid and unsure of myself. Everyone there appeared ready to impress recruiters with their glittering projects or give a perfect 90-second pitch, while I was even too afraid to drop off my resume. Why would they ever consider me? I had only taken one very basic computer science course and had so few accomplishments that I could present to boost myself. Shouldn’t people pursue things that they are good at? Why would I keep stubbornly adventuring in this new world, knowing that I would never be as smart as those brilliant brains?

Sometime I loved to seek answers to questions like “is it too late to learn to code” online. I was so surprised that so many people who also discover their passion in programming feel the same way just as I did. They lacked confidence, doubted their abilities and so they asked the same questions. I was also surprised that so many excellent software developers actually received their formal CS training and get their feet wet in the industry in their late 20s or even 30s. Much later than I did. One day I encountered a quote that I will never forget, “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.”This is told by one of the software engineers that I admire, who received a Phd in architecture but only started her programming journey at 27. Yes, it is ideal if we can start a thing as early as possible. However, starting late will never be an obstacle, if we are truly passionate about that thing and really want to make a difference.

Inspired by those stories shared by others, I started to redefine the formula that determine a good programmer. It is not all about past experience or age. If you have crazy ideas, if you never allow a problem get the better of you, if you see the world differently, and with at least some knowledge about the basics of programming, there is no reason why you should not be able to become an authority in that area. If you are alive, you can always pursue what you are fascinated with. Maybe I was just too anxious for success. Why not doing it now? I found the seeds (of my true interest) by serendipity. Why not sowing it now? Why not just growing it with 100% drive and determination? So I calmed down, started with basic ideas and easy problems, sought every opportunity to practice, self studied how to develop iOS apps, explored popular interview questions…I also tried to catch up and thus took three major-required math courses last quarter at the same time. Initially, they all said, “That would be impossible… You won’t make it! You can’t have three finals from 8 am to 6 pm on a same day.” However, I ended up with good grades and realized that, nothing stops you when you seriously begin to work hard. This quarter, I suddenly feel the subject is no longer that hard for me! After enough practice, tricky concepts gradually make sense and they all intertwine with each other in such a wonderful way. Also, I was thrilled by and rewarded with so many “Aha” moments that truly demonstrate my progress. So I copied this inspiring quote, neatly, on my notebook; thus, I can see the sentence whenever I open it in my later computer science courses. My tree is now growing, at a amazingly aspiring speed.

Kexin Yu | UCLA Career Center Peer Advisor B.S. Mathematics of Computation (2017)

A glimpse into a career as an Analyst at Medallia: One UCLA sophomore’s peek into the professional world

This is the second installment of our Career PREP blog series.  This past spring break over 45 UCLA students participated in the UCLA Career Center’s Career PREP program, which offers first and second year students the opportunity to participate in a one-day externship in order to explore a career field of their choice.  Here’s one of their stories… 

During the entire trip, we felt the warm welcome from our alumni. While staying with them, I felt we were so close to each other because our wonderful memories about UCLA overlapped so much. We chatted about the popular dining hall Feast, compact residential rooms in Hedrick, various courses and professors. They shared the anecdote that people will clap after someone breaks plates at dining halls—the tradition reserved until my day; I also strongly recommended that they visit the brand-new and super healthy dining hall Bruin Plate.

The most unforgettable part of the day was the field trip to Nordstrom and Apple store. There we were told to perform as real customers—to purchase something and think of the touch points of shoppers at these stores—and then design our own customer survey. Don’t worry about the money—we were provided with $30 to conduct this activity. I bought a bracelet at reduced price.

The method Medallia organized and presented its data is methodologically creative. Instead of extracting a small group of people from the population as a sample and searching into the sample, they first collect a huge amount of data and use Medallia-developed software to sort it out. Medallia helps many well-known companies like Lego and the Four Seasons hotel gather customer feedback and make corresponding analyses. Everyone at the company can browse the data, but presented differently–the frontline staff might only see the data of specific customers they directly interact with; the manager or the CEO might access the general trend of the company. Information being displayed hierarchically is one impressive thing I learned from my externship experience.

Before my arrival at the company, I had been looking forward to having a fuzzy sense of how a company is operated–what is a day of a working adult like. Undoubtedly, this simple wish was perfectly satisfied. Since I haven’t got deeply into my major courses, I didn’t expect that I could completely understand the professional stuff. But in the reality, the seemingly profound professional knowledge was simply conveyed to me and we even performed ourselves as team members and finished our own analysis.

Mengdi Yu

Mengdi Yu
Sophomore
Financial Actuarial Mathematics Major