Bloomberg Wants Bruins!

Bloomberg street view

Last week the UCLA Career Center was invited to visit Bloomberg’s headquarters in New York City, NY for their annual University Day.  UCLA is one of only 24 schools nationwide that Bloomberg invited to this exclusive event to attract more top technical talent.

What do you think of when you hear “Bloomberg“?  For most people, Michael Bloomberg (founder and former NYC mayor), financial information, and media are the first things that may spring to mind.  However, in terms of college recruiting, Bloomberg wants you to think of them as a tech company like Google, Facebook, or Apple.  Their primary hiring need is for Software Developers.

Bloomberg university list

Table assignments by university. You’ll see UCLA spent the day at a table with our “rivals” USC and Cal.

Work Environment

It just wouldn’t be a tech company without a lot of free food for employees.  They serve breakfast every morning, soup at 11am (for which the employees rush to the 6th floor en masse – it’s quite a sight to see), candy every afternoon, dinner at 8pm for those who are working late, and ice cream on Fridays.  And it’s not just a lot of food, it’s GOOD food.

There are no solid interior walls except for the user experience lab, where a team of researchers, designers, and engineers observe clients utilizing their products in order to gain insights and make improvements.  Not even the CEO and executives have office walls, nor does the “green room” where guests wait for their “on air” time in the TV and radio studios on the 5th floor.

We weren’t allowed to take photos of much of the interior of the building, but Business Insider did in 2012 when they spotlighted Bloomberg LP as one of the 15 coolest offices in tech.

Bloomberg horseshoe

The building is shaped like a horseshoe.  This symbol of good luck and fortune pervades Bloomberg’s culture.

Why NYC (aka Silicon Alley)?

New York is a rapidly expanding tech hub with over 3,000 tech companies located there.  Well established companies such as Google, Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Etsy and Yelp have NY locations, as do thousands of emerging startups.

Check out Made in NY for more info about the tech industry in NY and visit this Jobs Map to see where there are job openings at NY tech companies.

Bloomberg 29 view

View from the 29th floor of Bloomberg’s NYC office. That’s Central Park on the left. Not sure about you, but I could get used to this…

Opportunities for College Students and Graduates

Software Engineer Interns at Bloomberg get to work on real projects that will actually be used.  Their training is dynamic and hands-on and they have an opportunity to work alongside a cohort of fellow interns, as well as an assigned mentor.

In addition to the quality of the professional experience they gain, interns also get to enjoy a number of fun social perks including picnics, tech talks, game nights, contests, community service, and free museum admission throughout NYC for the summer.

Bloomberg group photo

UCLA Career Center staff, Dr. Bill Goodin, Bloomberg recruiters, and Bloomberg’s current UCLA interns at University Day 2015.

Full-time entry-level hires with a CS background go through a 12-week training bootcamp in which they work with various teams in order to determine their best fit.  Full-time entry-level hires with some relevant technical training/knowledge, but without a CS degree, go through a more intensive 16-week training class and come out the other end as software engineers!

When can you meet Bloomberg at UCLA? UPDATED 10/12/15

Don’t miss your opportunity to meet them in person to express your interest and learn more!  View our full list of Fairs & Events as well as our tips to help you Prepare for Career Fairs.

Mon 10/12: CS Internship Career Fair. 1pm-4pm.

Mon 10/12: UPE Honors Mixer. 5pm-6pm.

Tue 10/13: Computer Science Showcase. 6:30pm-8:30pm.

Wed 10/14: 2015 Engineering & Technical Fair Day 1. 11am-3pm.

Wed 10/28: Tech Talk. 6:30pm.

Wed 10/28: On-campus Interviews

Thu 10/29: On-campus Interviews Day 2

What do Bloomberg’s current UCLA interns have to say?

We were fortunate enough to meet five current summer interns over cupcakes to learn more about their experience at Bloomberg so far (they were in Week 3 of the internship).  They were clearly having a great time and had built up camaraderie with each other – laughing, smiling, and sharing stories.  Watch the following videos to hear two of the interns share some tips and insight with their fellow Bruins about the Bloomberg experience.

Why should UCLA students consider interning at Bloomberg?

How to prepare for an internship at Bloomberg?

The Greatest Piece of Advice I have Learned – Part 6

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If you ask me what I liked most about my Psychology classes, I would probably say the people you meet in them. There are some who are simply pursuing a Psychology degree because they think it’s “easy” and then there are the ones who are so nerdy and quirky that they talk about their classes during their dining hall meals with friends. I was definitely the latter. And my favorite conversations were with those who felt the same way.

In my second year, I met some people in my Developmental Psych class who made me realize something about myself – a fundamental flaw, I think, that kept me from taking on challenges, experiencing new things, and learning more about the world and myself.

That Developmental Psych class primarily involved group work, which allowed us to meet our fellow classmates and learn more about each other’s experiences with classes, professors, and various topics in Psychology. One of my friends, who happened to be a Cognitive Science major, couldn’t stop talking about her neuroscience courses, her research position in a memory research lab, and her interests outside of class. She was immensely passionate about her studies, and constantly pushed herself to do more.

I was particularly drawn to people like this because they conveyed a passion that was unlike anything I had seen before. They made me question some things about myself. Why was I so afraid to take a challenging course? Why did I never attend any student organization meetings? Why did I not apply for research positions? Why did I not apply for summer internships? Why did barely go to Professor’s office hours?

The field of Psychology encompasses a variety of different areas, ranging from Social and Developmental Psychology, all the way to Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience. When I first began to take classes, my interests were focused around the softer Psych classes, rather than the harder science courses. Unfortunately, as a Psychology major, there were some course requirements that I couldn’t run away from, such as Sensation and Perception and Cognitive Psychology. Of course, if I were not required to take those classes, I would definitely avoid them at all costs. In this case, I had no choice.

But it was because I had no choice that I realized just how much I enjoyed Cognitive Psychology. In fact, it turned out to be my favorite class at UCLA. Had I not been required to take it, I would have been too afraid and reluctant to take the class, and I would have never known…

…Which then begs the question, what else did I turn down in the past, that might’ve taught me something about myself, or might’ve given me extraordinary experience for a potential career path?

 At this point, I wouldn’t know. But it brings me to my next point – the greatest piece of advice I have learned.

“You are far too smart to be the only thing standing in your way.”   – Jennifer J. Freeman

That was my problem. I was the only thing standing in the way of all of the experiences I hadn’t had. I was simply afraid of failing. For that reason, I never tested new waters and I never had challenged myself with new opportunities.

I do not regret all the “risks” I did not take in the past because I was never aware that I was the only thing standing in my own way. But I’m here to remind you guys that if you’re afraid to take that one really hard class by that really difficult professor, just do it, try it out, you have absolutely nothing to lose. If you’re hesitant to apply for that summer internship, just do it, you may or may not get an interview, but at least you tried. If you’re reluctant to go to a career fair because you’re nervous about talking to employers, just do it, because you never know what might happen.

Personally, I would choose failures over the feelings of regret for not even trying.

Good luck on finals, everyone! But remember – the Career Center is open during Finals week if you still need help!

– Cynthia | Peer Advisor, UCLA Career Center

The Greatest Piece of Advice I Have Learned – Part 6

you-are-far-too-smart-to-be-the-only-thing-standing-in-your-own-way-37622

If you ask me what I liked most about my Psychology classes, I would probably say the people you meet in them. There are some who are simply pursuing a Psychology degree because they think it’s “easy” and then there are the ones who are so nerdy and quirky that they talk about their classes during their dining hall meals with friends. I was definitely the latter. And my favorite conversations were with those who felt the same way.

In my second year, I met some people in my Developmental Psych class who made me realize something about myself – a fundamental flaw, I think, that kept me from taking on challenges, experiencing new things, and learning more about the world and myself.

That Developmental Psych class primarily involved group work, which allowed us to meet our fellow classmates and learn more about each other’s experiences with classes, professors, and various topics in Psychology. One of my friends, who happened to be a Cognitive Science major, couldn’t stop talking about her neuroscience courses, her research position in a memory research lab, and her interests outside of class. She was immensely passionate about her studies, and constantly pushed herself to do more.

I was particularly drawn to people like this because they conveyed a passion that was unlike anything I had seen before. They made me question some things about myself. Why was I so afraid to take a challenging course? Why did I never attend any student organization meetings? Why did I not apply for research positions? Why did I not apply for summer internships? Why did barely go to Professor’s office hours?

The field of Psychology encompasses a variety of different areas, ranging from Social and Developmental Psychology, all the way to Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience. When I first began to take classes, my interests were focused around the softer Psych classes, rather than the harder science courses. Unfortunately, as a Psychology major, there were some course requirements that I couldn’t run away from, such as Sensation and Perception and Cognitive Psychology. Of course, if I were not required to take those classes, I would definitely avoid them at all costs. In this case, I had no choice.

But it was because I had no choice that I realized just how much I enjoyed Cognitive Psychology. In fact, it turned out to be my favorite class at UCLA. Had I not been required to take it, I would have been too afraid and reluctant to take the class, and I would have never known…

…Which then begs the question, what else did I turn down in the past, that might’ve taught me something about myself, or might’ve given me extraordinary experience for a potential career path?

 At this point, I wouldn’t know. But it brings me to my next point – the greatest piece of advice I have learned.

“You are far too smart to be the only thing standing in your way.”   – Jennifer J. Freeman

That was my problem. I was the only thing standing in the way of all of the experiences I hadn’t had. I was simply afraid of failing. For that reason, I never tested new waters and I never had challenged myself with new opportunities.

I do not regret all the “risks” I did not take in the past because I was never aware that I was the only thing standing in my own way. But I’m here to remind you guys that if you’re afraid to take that one really hard class by that really difficult professor, just do it, try it out, you have absolutely nothing to lose. If you’re hesitant to apply for that summer internship, just do it, you may or may not get an interview, but at least you tried. If you’re reluctant to go to a career fair because you’re nervous about talking to employers, just do it, because you never know what might happen.

Personally, I would choose failures over the feelings of regret for not even trying.

Good luck on finals, everyone! But remember – the Career Center is open during Finals week if you still need help!

– Cynthia | Peer Advisor, UCLA Career Center

THE GREATEST PIECE OF ADVICE I HAVE LEARNED – Part 4

Hi there!

As a senior graduating some time in the near future, I’m here to share with you the greatest piece(s) of advice I’ve learned along my four years in college and 21 years of existence. I say pieces, because it’s hard for me to distill these instances down into a singular defining moment. So rather, I’m going to tell you about the path I went along to obtaining and internalizing these things.

I’d consider my identity unique, but I know it’s far from uncommon at UCLA. I’m the child of first-generation immigrants, who toiled to build lives for themselves anew, amongst great uncertainty. Fortunately for me, my parents were mostly successful. And since they (and the first-generational culture they surrounded themselves with) had discovered how to “make it,” they passed these formulas down to the second-generation (that’s me, and quite possibly you).

Most often these paths included the career arenas of Medicine, Engineering, Law, and Business — which is great if you are inclined towards and actually enjoy the above mentioned professions. But I never once had a second-generation friend who went to their parents with “I want to be an writer/artist/insert creative or alternative path here _____” and received encouragement. Instead, they would hear what so many immigrant parents tell their children:  “_____ is not the safest route in life. We didn’t sacrifice all this for you to take up a precarious profession.”

That brings me towards advice piece #1. Hint: I am one of those people. I’ve been a high achiever my whole life and rather gifted at math and science. I pursued that safety formula for as long as I can remember, without really understanding why. Suffice it to say, I hit a breaking point halfway through college and realized I didn’t want to spend the rest of my time at school, or in my life doing something I didn’t really enjoy all that much. I watched this TED talk by Larry Smith called Why you will fail to have a great career. In his talk, Smith speaks about passion being the driving force for a life lived to its utmost potential, and the difference between settling for mediocrity and a creating a truly great career.

After I heard Smith’s talk, everything kind of just clicked for me. I took his words and juxtaposed them with what my parents and their culture had been urging onto me. And while I accept that the thought process comes from a place of concern and compassion — they only want to ensure security and alleviate potential suffering for their children — I decided I could not settle for the formula for success (read: safety).

And that brings me to the second point of advice. In Smith’s equation, there is no room for safety. But deliberately placing yourself on the front lines of uncertainty is something easier said than done, especially when you have people around you questioning your choices at all times. I didn’t fully grasp the significance of my decision, or come up with a way to justify it to myself amidst anxiety and self-doubt, until I heard Dr. Brené Brown’s thoughts on The Power of Vulnerability. I know at this point I’m beginning to sound like I work for the marketing team at TED, but I don’t, I promise (although I guess that could be cool). I do, however, think these talks are among the site’s most popular for a reason.

Brown’s talk taught me one of the most important things I’ve learned in my life. It is that being vulnerable  I mean really embracing it as fundamental — is essential to attaining joy and fulfillment.

So where does this leave me now? Well, it’s almost going to be two years since I decided to deviate from my selected formula of safety (pre-med) and into a path more authentic and enjoyable for me (film school). I’m graduating soon, and even if the future may be a bit uncertain, I know that all will be well when I’m following and nurturing my passions with vulnerability.

Vesta Partovi | UCLA Career Center Peer Advisor

THE GREATEST PIECE OF ADVICE I HAVE EVER LEARNED – Part 3

Growing up, I played soccer and volleyball competitively, and I loved it. Not necessarily for the life advice but because I loved the thrill of the game and the challenge. Looking back, it wasn’t until I stopped playing that I realized all the lessons I had learned playing soccer and volleyball could be directly applied to life in general.

There is one piece of advice in particular that I consider the “greatest” though. Let me set the stage:

By my sophomore/junior year of high school, I felt pretty burnt out on sports after playing in back to back seasons for so long. I also wanted to focus more on my academics before applying to college. I had not planned on playing club volleyball, but my coaches and former teammates/friends convinced me that we should have one last hurrah. We would only practice once a week for a couple hours and go to 4 tournaments total. I agreed, and the season got started without a hitch. The greatest piece of advice I ever received didn’t occur until our 3rd tournament in Reno, NV though. In Reno, our team was seeded 164 out of about 170 teams, so basically the bottom of the barrel. Since we weren’t participating in any leagues, the tournament coordinators didn’t know how where to place us so they put us at the bottom. I can’t exactly remember how most of the games played out or the rankings of those teams. (This is common, considering a team could play up to 12 matches in a weekend).

I do however remember one specific team from the second day of the tournament. They were from Colorado, ranked 6th in the entire tournament, and stood about a foot taller than me (Keep in mind, I’m only 5’2″ but still). We went into playing this match as we did with every other game: just excited to be there and ready to put it all out on the floor. Channeling this energy, we won the first game! But the match wasn’t over yet. We had to win 2 out of 3. So we played on. And they took the second game… This meant there was only one more game and 15 points standing between us and taking the number 6 rank. The game started and we were losing. That’s when my coach intervened with a time out with the greatest advice I have received,

“ARE YOU JUST GOING TO ROLL OVER AND DIE, OR ARE YOU GOING TO FIGHT FOR THIS?”

So maybe this wasn’t put in the most eloquent way, but it was practical and exactly what we needed to motivate us. (We won the game by the way). Out of all the advice I’ve been given, I have found this the most valuable because it can be applied to anything. Like not getting the grade I wanted. Or struggling to find an internship. Or getting frustrated with bureaucracy at school. It’s easy to feel powerless or down on your luck. But I believe that in most situations there is a choice: to roll over and die, or to fight. It all depends on how badly you want something and if you’re willing to continue to pursue it. The key is in the approach. Instead of defeat, frame it as a challenge. I can guarantee that most people will not do that. Taking that extra step, and fighting for something can make all the difference in getting to where you want to be.

Stephanie Lee | UCLA Career Center Peer Advisor

THE GREATEST PIECE OF ADVICE I HAVE LEARNED – Part 2

95475-12042514041853 Last year, with choosing a major being one of my primary headaches, I, unexpectedly, decided to take a computer science course. I heard coding consumes life. I knew projects are often finished through a week of trial and error. My friend’s joke that she woke up at 3 am suddenly with a solution to one homework problems finally occurring to her head indeed intimidated me. Still, with no programming background, I was determined to take up such a challenge.

Although I was overwhelmed by the endless concepts in this new world most of the time, I was totally amazed by how everything works magically. I could still remember the time when I started to get myself familiar with the software development environment on a computer and spent almost an hour in attempting to create my very first project by carefully following the instructions word by word (even though I knew nothing about their meanings) I jotted down even the simplest codes that my professor mentioned in lectures and could not wait to run them on a physical computer after class.

However, as time went by, I became increasingly frustrated. My frustrations not only came from staring at my computer for hours without coming up with even a single line of code or frequently debugging my programs till very late at night. I felt I fell behind most of my peer who were already programming experts or gifted prodigies. Some started at a pretty young age and were already fluent in various programming languages. Others were proud of their experience in working on complicated projects with large teams prestigious companies or even have several original mobile apps to their names. People always say that talent play a large role in this industry. Am I a real late starter? I constantly asked myself whenever I had a hard time understanding a chunk of code while others seem to finish doing it so effortlessly. I attended those engineering career fairs, timid and unsure of myself. Everyone there appeared ready to impress recruiters with their glittering projects or give a perfect 90-second pitch, while I was even too afraid to drop off my resume. Why would they ever consider me? I had only taken one very basic computer science course and had so few accomplishments that I could present to boost myself. Shouldn’t people pursue things that they are good at? Why would I keep stubbornly adventuring in this new world, knowing that I would never be as smart as those brilliant brains?

Sometime I loved to seek answers to questions like “is it too late to learn to code” online. I was so surprised that so many people who also discover their passion in programming feel the same way just as I did. They lacked confidence, doubted their abilities and so they asked the same questions. I was also surprised that so many excellent software developers actually received their formal CS training and get their feet wet in the industry in their late 20s or even 30s. Much later than I did. One day I encountered a quote that I will never forget, “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.”This is told by one of the software engineers that I admire, who received a Phd in architecture but only started her programming journey at 27. Yes, it is ideal if we can start a thing as early as possible. However, starting late will never be an obstacle, if we are truly passionate about that thing and really want to make a difference.

Inspired by those stories shared by others, I started to redefine the formula that determine a good programmer. It is not all about past experience or age. If you have crazy ideas, if you never allow a problem get the better of you, if you see the world differently, and with at least some knowledge about the basics of programming, there is no reason why you should not be able to become an authority in that area. If you are alive, you can always pursue what you are fascinated with. Maybe I was just too anxious for success. Why not doing it now? I found the seeds (of my true interest) by serendipity. Why not sowing it now? Why not just growing it with 100% drive and determination? So I calmed down, started with basic ideas and easy problems, sought every opportunity to practice, self studied how to develop iOS apps, explored popular interview questions…I also tried to catch up and thus took three major-required math courses last quarter at the same time. Initially, they all said, “That would be impossible… You won’t make it! You can’t have three finals from 8 am to 6 pm on a same day.” However, I ended up with good grades and realized that, nothing stops you when you seriously begin to work hard. This quarter, I suddenly feel the subject is no longer that hard for me! After enough practice, tricky concepts gradually make sense and they all intertwine with each other in such a wonderful way. Also, I was thrilled by and rewarded with so many “Aha” moments that truly demonstrate my progress. So I copied this inspiring quote, neatly, on my notebook; thus, I can see the sentence whenever I open it in my later computer science courses. My tree is now growing, at a amazingly aspiring speed.

Kexin Yu | UCLA Career Center Peer Advisor B.S. Mathematics of Computation (2017)

The Greatest Piece of Advice I have Learned – Part 1

I’ve spent a good chunk of my 19 years giving advice to others. As an older sister, a junior consultant, and now as a Peer Advisor. But as much as I love sharing my own insights (especially to my roommate’s dilemmas: Black pants or grey? Boots or sneakers? Is my eyeliner even?), it’s definitely refreshing to have someone else guide me instead.
Now, to the theme of this post: I want to share with you guys the best piece of advice I’ve received–it’s actually a quote from a Bruin Consulting alum. I joined BC this past Fall, and I never could have anticipated how quickly it has changed my life. I was exposed to the world of business and Biz Econ majors, “163” and “103,” upperclassmen with completely different career interests than me. During a “BC NorCal dinner” over Christmas break, I met one alum named Venkat. He asked me about school, as usual, and I asked him what he did at his current job in San Francisco. He worked in healthcare, which is the field I hope to pursue. Not only did he explain his directorship at The Advisory Board Company, he also touched upon current issues and inefficiencies in healthcare. Plus, he also had a hilarious, goofy personality, which made listening to him speak about health insurance a lot easier to understand.
Now, this is the advice I took from him: I asked Venkat what I should be doing my 2nd year, so that I could be on the “right track” for a career in health administration. Over Americanos and omelettes South of Market Street, he shared his ultimate life hack with me. Venkat suggested that I start networking and gaining experience as soon as possible. He pointed out, “Good things come to those who wait….but only the things left by those who hustle.” No matter what you are interested in pursuing, just pursue it. Don’t wait for opportunities to fall in your lap, or for someone to just hand you a job. They won’t. Work hard, work relentlessly, work smartly. Don’t rely on finding internships the easy way, because that’s how 99% of other people are doing it too. In all, it’s never too early (or too late!) to gain relevant experience in your desired field.
How am I applying this advice in my own life back at UCLA? Well, to be honest, it has been a work in progress. Some days I just want to relax with my friends, and other days I spend on Linkedin or working on cover letters. But, I do keep his quote in my mind every day. Every day, I try to be productive in some way. In my academics, in my social relationships, in my work, or in my career. Being at UCLA is such a precious experience. We are in an environment with such innovative people, distinguished professors and faculty, and numerous opportunities. Take advantage of that, Bruins. Don’t wait for life to happen to you, make your life happen now.
Jesselyn Wang | UCLA Career Center Peer Advisor